Bias lighting for TV using LED-strip New

Bias lighting is, simply put, to light up the wall behind a monitor or TV. This creates a glow around the screen and, supposedly, creates a more comfortable and high contrast viewing experience. I made my bias lighting simply by sticking a LED-strip behind the TV.

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Emergency strobe light

The emergency strobe light consists of 33 high intensive 5 mm LEDs and control circuit. It has four sequences, and can be set on a single sequence or to cycle through every fifth second. When selecting a sequence manually it is stored in EEPROM and continues on power-up. If an external controlling unit is plugged in; the internal sequences will stop and the external unit is in control. This makes it possible to synchronize multiple units. LEDs are driven by a PWM output, module is powered by 9-24V.

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Kitchen cabinet lights with 10mm LEDs New

In my old apartment, and before LED lights were cheap and everywhere, I build my own LED down-lights and put then in my kitchen cabinet. Two lights, each with four warm-white 10mm high-intensity LEDs, and a simple fuse and switch box. Powered by a 5 volt AC adapter.

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Mood light using 3W Prolight RGB LED

This mood light consists of a Prolight RGB 3W LED, a heat sink and four rubber feet. The four rubber feet form a base on which e.g. a glass ball, or something else transparent can be placed. It will be lit up by the LED and looks pretty cool. Powered by: 5V.

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Night light using 1W Prolight LED

I used this 1W white Prolight LED inside an old light fixture to serve as a night lights in our old basement. It emits a total of 25 lumen in 140 degrees, the light intensity is equal to a 5 to 10 Watt bulb. Low power consumption and perfect as a night light, or inside closets etc. Powered by: 5V.

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Warning lights with 10mm LEDs New

Four very simple LED warning lights, with a total of 10 LEDs; 2x2 and 2x3. The yellow LEDs have four chips, making them pretty bright. And with a 40 degree light beam they are quite visible, even more so at a distance. So they make pretty good warning lights. Powered by: 12-13.8V.

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Warning strobe light controller

The warning lights controller has two PWM driven outputs, that each can handle a load of 3 amps. It has five sequences, and can be set on a single sequence or to cycle through. When selecting a sequence manually it is stored in EEPROM and continues on power-up. Much of the hardware and software is based on the Emergency strobe light project. Can be used to drive the Warning lights with 10mm LEDs project. Powered by: 9-24V.

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