Found 171 images also using this tag.

Lync presence (busy) light

Work in progress, check back often

When I am at work, I use headphones; a lot. About half the time I am listening to music, the other half I am talking with someone on Lync (Skype for Business). This has made it difficult for my collages to know whether I am available or not, so I get interrupted when I’m on the phone. I needed a way to communicate my availability, and Lync already does a pretty good job with this; it’s red when I am in a meeting, on the phone or simple do not want to be disturbed. Yellow when I’m away; I don’t think the away part is a problem, when my chair is empty I am usually away… And green: come on in! Enter the Lync presence light, or busy light if you will. Yeah there are some you can buy, but where is the fun in that? So I made one using an Arduino board.

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Emergency strobe light

The emergency strobe light consists of 33 high intensive 5 mm LEDs and control circuit. It has four sequences, and can be set on a single sequence or to cycle through every fifth second. When selecting a sequence manually it is stored in EEPROM and continues on power-up. If an external controlling unit is plugged in; the internal sequences will stop and the external unit is in control. This makes it possible to synchronize multiple units. LEDs are driven by a PWM output, module is powered by 9-24V.

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Mood light (RBG) with 100 mA outputs

This simple mood light controller has three PWM controlled channels; red, green and blue. Each capable of delivering 100 mA, or about five LEDs. This can easily be improved by using a more powerful transistor. I’ve used 3x3 LEDs soldered to a tiny circuit board as the light source, and placed them inside a frosted glass. A better solution would be to use a powerful RBG LED. Just remember to use another transistor if you want to use bigger LEDs.

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Mood light (RGB) controller with 500mA outputs

The mood light controller can control all kinds of RGB light, max 500mA pr. channel. The module has no voltage regulator and therefore needs 5V=, and enough current to drive the circuit and the connected LEDs. It very slowly cycles through different colors, fading one LED up or down leaving the previous LED turned on. The module can power Prolight LEDs, like Mood light using 3W Prolight RGB LED.

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Night light using 1W Prolight LED

I used this 1W white Prolight LED inside an old light fixture to serve as a night lights in our old basement. It emits a total of 25 lumen in 140 degrees, the light intensity is equal to a 5 to 10 Watt bulb. Low power consumption and perfect as a night light, or inside closets etc. Powered by: 5V.

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Warning strobe light controller

The warning lights controller has two PWM driven outputs, that each can handle a load of 3 amps. It has five sequences, and can be set on a single sequence or to cycle through. When selecting a sequence manually it is stored in EEPROM and continues on power-up. Much of the hardware and software is based on the Emergency strobe light project. Can be used to drive the Warning lights with 10mm LEDs project. Powered by: 9-24V.

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Mood light using 3W Prolight RGB LED

This mood light consists of a Prolight RGB 3W LED, a heat sink and four rubber feet. The four rubber feet form a base on which e.g. a glass ball, or something else transparent can be placed. It will be lit up by the LED and looks pretty cool. Powered by: 5V.

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Ikea kids play kitchen LED lighting

My nephew, and my twin boys, both have a Ikea play kitchen. It’s a pretty cool toy, with a microwave, oven, sink, cabinets and hot plates. The plates have LEDs so they turn red when turned on, just to make it a bit more real. But the play kitchen is even greater with some lights!

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Warning lights with 10mm LEDs

Four very simple LED warning lights, with a total of 10 LEDs; 2x2 and 2x3. The yellow LEDs have four chips, making them pretty bright. And with a 40 degree light beam they are quite visible, even more so at a distance. So they make pretty good warning lights. Powered by: 12-13.8V.

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LED dot light with 10mm LED

In my old apartment I used these small dot lights under shelves above my desk. If mounted close to the wall they give a cool cone effect, not terribly bright but pretty decorative and not intrusive. And they are really easy to make; one LED, resistor and a small plastic box, 10 minutes, tops. Powered by: 5V.

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Bias lighting for TV using LED-strip

Bias lighting is, simply put, to light up the wall behind a monitor or TV. This creates a glow around the screen and, supposedly, creates a more comfortable and high contrast viewing experience. I made my bias lighting simply by sticking a LED-strip behind the TV.

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SOS station toy with yellow and blue LEDs

A while back my kids got this SOS station toy, it came with a few emergency cars and the boys quite liked it. My girl friend and myself however; hated it, it had a speaker and made a high siren sound and an annoying voice would shout things like “all cars respond”. So I modified it; ripped out the speaker and mounted a few LEDs instead, so now it flashes but no sound.

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LED front and fog lights on RC car

My brother-in-law is into RC car drifting, and a big part of that is of course to have a cool-looking car! He used a LED light kit, but the front lights were not that great. Very blueish and the intensity of the LEDs varied quite a bit. So I replaced the LEDs and installed some fog lights, it ended up quite decent looking I think :)

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Emergency LEDs on the kids' walking car

My two twin boys are pretty into Fireman Sam these days, so the red walking car they got when they were babies got an upgrade. Four blue self-flashing LEDs, a toggle switch and a 2xAA battery holder; everything bought cheap on eBay. And voila! A fire truck with blue emergency lights.

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Uplights with white and UV/red 5mm LEDs

In my old apartment I built four of these uplights and mounted them on my living room wall, in an upward line. They didn’t really produce that much light, but it gave a cool effect on the wall. Especially the white and UV together kind of looked like a propane flame. Powered by: 5V.

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