Found 1 article, 85 images also using this tag.

Fan and temperature controller with LCD

The module uses an LM35 sensor for measuring the temperature, it is a pre-calibrated IC with output voltage linearly-proportional to the Centigrade temperature. This is read directly by the internal AVR ADC, and turned into actual degrees with a simple calculation. The fan is powered by an PWM output, giving it variable speed. Set points for the fan and alarm can be adjusted and is saved to EEPROM.

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Security keypad with programmable PIN

This module uses an AVR microcontroller to interface a cheap numeric keypad. The PIN code is set by the user and stored in EEPROM. If entered correctly; a one second pulse is sent on either output 1 or 2, depending on the selected mode. A tamper pin will be shorted to 0V when the module is connected. This keypad module is not itself meant to control anything, but it provides trigger signals for other control modules to act upon. It has three LEDs (green, red and alarm) which can be used to convey messages from that other control module. Powered by: 5V.

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Light sensor with LED display

This module measures light intensity and shows it on a scale from 0 to 782 on the LED display. By multiplying that value with 5, and then divide by 127 you get the light intensity in µW/cm2. If the light intensity rises over or falls below (configurable) the set point; the output activates, with a hysteresis of +-25. The module has two outputs; a constant and a pulse. The constant output can be used to drive e.g. a relay, while the pulse can communicate with other equipment. Powered by: 9-24V.

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Mood light (RBG) with 100 mA outputs

This simple mood light controller has three PWM controlled channels; red, green and blue. Each capable of delivering 100 mA, or about five LEDs. This can easily be improved by using a more powerful transistor. I’ve used 3x3 LEDs soldered to a tiny circuit board as the light source, and placed them inside a frosted glass. A better solution would be to use a powerful RBG LED. Just remember to use another transistor if you want to use bigger LEDs.

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Power supply and fuse monitoring module New

This was the first AVR microcontroller module I ever built, it was made for and installed in the rack box project. As the name suggests it monitored that the essentials were OK, that means power supplies, fuses and communication. It used optocouplers to detect if the 5 or 12 V power supply failed, but depended on other modules for the fuse, emergency supply and communication failure.

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Sound alarm control unit

This simple unit controls three sound signals; beep, siren and buzzer. Each sound signal will only be given once when a new alarm is triggered, the input must remain clear for at least four seconds for that signal to rearm. A beep is given every six minutes if an alarm is active, as a reminder. The sound LED flashes when a sound alarm is active; once for signal 1 (beep), twice for signal 2 (siren) and three times for signal 3 (buzzer), this flashing pattern is repeated.

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Warning strobe light controller

The warning lights controller has two PWM driven outputs, that each can handle a load of 3 amps. It has five sequences, and can be set on a single sequence or to cycle through. When selecting a sequence manually it is stored in EEPROM and continues on power-up. Much of the hardware and software is based on the Emergency strobe light project. Can be used to drive the Warning lights with 10mm LEDs project. Powered by: 9-24V.

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Mood light (RGB) controller with 500mA outputs

The mood light controller can control all kinds of RGB light, max 500mA pr. channel. The module has no voltage regulator and therefore needs 5V=, and enough current to drive the circuit and the connected LEDs. It very slowly cycles through different colors, fading one LED up or down leaving the previous LED turned on. The module can power Prolight LEDs, like Mood light using 3W Prolight RGB LED.

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Emergency strobe light

The emergency strobe light consists of 33 high intensive 5 mm LEDs and control circuit. It has four sequences, and can be set on a single sequence or to cycle through every fifth second. When selecting a sequence manually it is stored in EEPROM and continues on power-up. If an external controlling unit is plugged in; the internal sequences will stop and the external unit is in control. This makes it possible to synchronize multiple units. LEDs are driven by a PWM output, module is powered by 9-24V.

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Alarm disabling unit for production equipment

This module was built for a production equipment at my previous workplace, it made it possible for an operator to silence an alarm without resolving it. Fixing an error could take some time and having the alarm horn sound during that period was very annoying, so many operators removed the alarm relay. This was unfortunate because it was not always put back, so the next alarm situation could go unnoticed. This module would silence the alarm, but still reactive it once the situation had been resolved. Eliminating the need to remove the alarm relay. Powered by: 9-24V.

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Electronic switch with 4 channels and voltage regulator

I used to have a very small apartment, and in that apartment I made a lot of the LED lights myself. To make it easier to control and power them I also built this electronic light switch. With a voltage regulator, and large heat-sink, it took 9 to 24 volts in; and gave out four channels of 5 volts. I used dual-color red and green LEDs to show the state of each output, and push-buttons to toggle them. After 10 seconds on inactivity the LEDs would turn off. The maximum load pr. channel were 500mA, not a lot but enough to drive some LEDs.

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Home power consumption measuring unit

In Norway we have a LED in our home fuse boxes that flashes a defined number of times per kW, this unit measures the home power consumption by counting those pulses. This is calculated into kW and can be read from a computer over the serial interface. In addition to this unit you will need a sensor to read the LED, that is not covered in this project. It is important that this sensor is accurate to get precise values.

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Intruder alarm system controller

I build this intruder alarm controller for my old apartment. It had two modes; away and armed. It was activated either with a key switch, or using the Security keypad with programmable PIN module. When the key switch was turned, a green and red LED started to toggle back and forth. If the key was turned back on green, the away mode would activate, if on red then the system would arm. The key switch and LEDs was mounted in status panel that I had in the apartment.

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Alarm disabling unit for production equipment with long stop warning

This module was built for a production equipment at my previous workplace, it made it possible for an operator to silence an alarm without resolving it. Fixing an error could take some time and having the alarm horn sound during that period was very annoying, so many operators removed the alarm relay. This was unfortunate because it was not always put back, so the next alarm situation could go unnoticed. This module would silence the alarm, but still reactive it once the situation had been resolved. Eliminating the need to remove the alarm relay. This production equipment was a temperature tester, keeping it running was vital for the temperature to be stable. Powered by: 9-24V.

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Warning strobe light controller for car

On my old car, a Subaru Legacy, I built and installed warning lights on all sides. Never really used them, but it was a fun build. I had a total of 8 LED warning lights, all around the car. The lights on the side was used as side markers when not flashing. I originally used the red break light as the rear warning light, but later replaced it with two self-built warning lights.

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